Autism Acceptance Month | Gilbert, AZ Photographer

I post quite a bit about my sweet Natalie. April is a very special month for us.
At two years old, Natalie was diagnosed with ASD and shortly after we met with
a neurologist. We were informed that we would more than likely never have a conversation
with our little girl.
At that time this was all new to us. All just totally dropped on us and we had zero
resources and zero information. We only had those words that he spit out that day.
I really want to write this to not only encourage anyone who could be going through something
similar, but to brag on my seriously amazing child!
Natalie is now five years old. She is using some sentences, playing with her peers and not
only beside them, she can tell us what she wants using her words (foods, toys, potty, drink),
and she asks for hugs and kisses.
Natalie has taught herself to play songs on her keyboard, drums along to the beat, and also
sings in key (most of the time, ha!)
I will never say it is easy. There are moments when things are so hard I wonder how God trusted
me to make it through.
Natalie is a runner, and boy is she quick! She does NOT do well in others homes that are not
her own. She doesn’t always do well going out to eat (unless there is pizza). She eats very few
varieties of food, and hides what she doesn’t eat under the sofa.
The hardest part is not being the mother of a special needs child, but living in a world
where we beg for acceptance of our children. We should not have to beg people to love and
accept our children any more than any other parents.
Living in a world where people who have never experienced autism first handed post and
share articles on what they believe causes autism or “cures” it.
I will end with saying that there is nothing that my family did wrong to “cause” our child to become autistic. There is nothing wrong with our child. She is not slow. She understands what you
say even if she doesn’t respond the way you would assume she should.
Our daughter does not need to be cured, and doesn’t need awareness. She needs acceptance.
She needs to live in a world where other children and adults are taught to ACCEPT who she is.
To not bully and tease.
She is sweet, kind, smart, and perfect. She is our daughter, and she is autistic.

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8 comments
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  • Melani - Love this… what a beautiful little princess!ReplyCancel

  • Asea Tremp - Bless her heart, she is just beautiful. Your words are just perfect too, and I’m saying that as a fellow ASD mom myself. <3ReplyCancel

  • Pamela B Lewis - Your daughter is beautiful and I love your photographs of her! I especially love the ones of you and her together. So gorgeous!ReplyCancel

  • Elaina Borchelt - Beautiful words along with beautiful photos. She is perfectly perfect. <3ReplyCancel

  • Kassie Sloss Maroney - I adore the golden hour photo in the middle. Beautiful!ReplyCancel

  • Hayley Willis - Gorgeous photos, she’s a beautiful little girl. I *love* the one of her with the butterfly. Your words struck a chord here too.ReplyCancel

  • Thuvân Ng-Ph - Natalie is so beautiful. What I have learned is that the more you made it awared of her situation, the more she will receive acceptance. Simply people (including myself) are not aware of what’s going on with other children. My child had a classmate who was special need. At the beginning of the school year, his mom wrote a little book, nothing elaborated, copy in colors, introducing her son and his condition. It really helped because I got to know him and mom and we became friends.ReplyCancel

  • Frame This Moment Photography - Natalie is so beautiful. What I have learned is that the more you made it awared of her situation, the more she will receive acceptance. Simply people (including myself) are not aware of what’s going on with other children. My child had a classmate who was special need. At the beginning of the school year, his mom wrote a little book, nothing elaborated, copy in colors, introducing her son and his condition. It really helped because I got to know him and mom and we became friends.ReplyCancel

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